INTERNATIONAL NEWS
June 13, 2012 12:00:00 AM
  Follow @ Twitter

Men who are doctors earn about $12,000 more per year than women doctors, according to a US study published on Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The differences persisted even after adjusting for factors like specialty, academic rank and work hours, said researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School.

"The gender pay disparity we found in this highly talented and select group of physicians was sobering," said lead study author Reshma Jagsi, associate professor of radiation oncology.

The survey focused on 800 physicians who had received a competitive early career research grant from the National Institutes of Health in 2000-2003. At the time of the salary assessment, all were considered mid-career.

They answered 39 survey questions on age, medical specialty, marital status, work hours, time spent in research, number of peer-reviewed publications, location, race, additional grants, leadership roles and other degrees.

"People point to a lot of possible reasons for pay disparities, so we examined a population in which you would be least likely to pick up gender differences in salary," said Jagsi.

"After we adjusted for a host of factors that could explain pay differences, we unmasked a pay disparity of $12,001 a year, or more than $350,000 over a career."

Overall, the average annual salary was $200,422 for men and $167,669 for women, a difference of $32,764.

When researchers adjusted for differences driven by medical specialty, the salary gap narrowed to $17,874 for the men.

An adjustment for all variable factors led to the final gap of $12,001.

Jagsi described the divide as "both surprising and disturbing" and expressed hope that the research would inform future policy discussions on how to ensure equal pay for equal work.

Senior author Peter Ubel, a professor at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and its Sanford School of Public Policy, said medical centers should take steps to assure fairer pay.

"For all we know, women are paid less in part because they don't negotiate as assertively as men, or because their spouse's jobs make it harder for them to entertain competing job offers," Ubel said.

"Nevertheless, whatever the reason for the salary disparity, academic medical centers should work to pay more fairly. A person's salary should not depend upon whether they have a Y chromosome."

AFP

Wiggle


PREVIOUS STORY
India to elect new president next month: official
NEXT STORY
Church of England warns against gay marriage plan

Bookmark and Share
   




FIJI NEWS
Safe Fiji means more investors: NatuvaFiji’s Minister for Defence Timoci Natuva has urged all police offices to work together for a brighter future.
BUSINESS
Exchange suspends trading in FFF shares, notesSouth Pacific Stock Exchange (SPSE) has suspended trading in Future Forests (Fiji) Limited shares and notes after the company failed to release its audited financial statements for its financial year ending 30 June 2014.
SPORTS
Nauga maintains pack, changes backsNadroga coach Esala Nauga has made four changes, all in the backs, to his run-on-side that defeated Tailevu last week for the sixth HFC Bank Farebrother match against Namosi on Saturday.
TECHNOLOGY
Vodafone Fiji, Tonga telco in allianceVodafone Fiji and Tonga Communications Corporation today signed a strategic partnership alliance that will allow the Tongan company to leverage off the experience of their Fijian counterparts.
HEALTH/FITNESS
Clean-up day to curb dengue outbreakFiji's Ministry of Health has declared a clean-up day next Thursday for residents in the central division as it ups the tempo against a dengue fever outbreak currently experienced in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
Rock Or Bust is AC DC's new albumAC DC has announced the release of Rock Or Bust, the band’s first studio album in six years.
NEWS SPORTS INFOTAINMENT SERVICES MOBILE EXTRA HOT TOPICS